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On this page you will find Nikkei Telecom user experiences from Europe, Middle East & Africa.

The Fourth Nikkei Telecom Japanese Speech Contest
April 2016@

The Fourth Nikkei Telecom Speech Contest was held on 22nd April 2016 at the University of East Anglia. This was the first time the contest has been held at UEA. All the final year Japanese language students in the School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies were required to make a speech on the topic of their choice using articles on the Nikkei Telecom database in the oral presentation class. All the students worked very hard under pressure as they are the first to graduate. The six students were chosen to make a speech in front of judges and an audience.

Natalie Stanley won the first prize; gIgirisu no Nihongo Kyoikuh. Natalie chose an article about gSkype Translatorsh and she found that there is no Japanese translator function. She questions whether the Japanese language is important, and examines Japanese learning in the U.K. Natalie wants to become a Japanese teacher in a British school and support Japanese language education in the UK.

The second prize went to Ida Hauge for gNihon no Josei Rodo no Taisetsusa h. Ida expressed her opinion of the Japanese work environment for women compared to her country, Norway, where women have a much better chance of equal treatment at work. Ida also suggested ways in which to improve the working environment for women in Japan.

The Nikkei Telecom special prize was awarded to Emily Zwart for hMatahara - Anzuruyori Umu Ga Yasushih. Maternity harassment is another problem for working women in Japan. Emily researched and explained several problems facing pregnant women working in Japanese companies.

The students praised the Nikkei newspaper article database for its inclusion of such a wide range of engaging articles which are relevant to their personal interests and academic needs.

gThe Nikkei newspaper articles are good. Very interesting! h
gThe database was easy to get used to and the Navigational Article Search was helpful when searching within the database.h




The contest was a success for all participants and it was good to receive such positive comments and support from the lecturers.
We congratulate all of the contestants and final year Japanese language students. We thank the lecturers, and the special panel of judges: Mrs Mami Mizutori from the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures and Dr Simon Kaner of The Head of the Centre for Japanese Studies.

We hope in the future, more students learn that being able to speak and read fluently in a second language enables them to read and discuss a vastly greater range of articles. All this quality reading material allows people to develop an awareness of different cultural issues and various worldwide perspectives.
We will continue to encourage and assist Japanese learners in improving their Japanese language skills through Nikkei Telecom.

If you are interested in Nikkei Telecom for educational purposes, please contact the Electronic Media department click here for an Enquiry Form or Email telecom21@eur.nikkei.com.


The Third Nikkei Telecom Japanese Speech Contest
March 2016@

The Third Nikkei Telecom Speech Contest at the University of Edinburgh for their final year students took place on 30th March 2016. This is the second time that the fourth year Japanese Studies students have taken part in the contest. All finalists were required to write a brief introduction and make a speech on the topic of their choice using articles on the Nikkei Telecom database. The six students were chosen to make a speech in front of judges and students. The contestants all gave great speeches that they had been preparing which incorporated everything they had learnt in the past four years. The contest was highly competitive.

Kerry Balkwill won the first prize; gNihon ni Okeru Machi Okoshih. Kelly explained what she had learnt about gMachi Okoshih (town renewal projects) in small Japanese towns, and the possibility of adapting these ideas to her home town of Leicester. She chose several articles from Nikkei Local and Nikkei MJ newspapers to support her speech.

The second prize was awarded to Eleanor Hamilton-Darrah for gNihon wa Soki Eigo Kyoiku o Donyu Subekika? - Nihon Go o Benkyo Shite Omotta Kotoh in which she questioned assumptions about early stage English language education in Japan.

The Nikkei Telecom special prize went to Corinne Meehan for hKabuki to Kakushinh. Kabuki dates from 1603, and breaking traditional rules, Super Kabuki emerged 383 years later. Corinne made a speech about this new innovation in Japan where Kabuki performances combine traditional movement with modern theatre technology.

gWhen I enter keywords, they come up in all text not only in the titles of the articles. I found this really usefulh

gUsually, I choose some topics from the books in the library then start searching on the databases or online. To find the right Japanese documents to support my essay was quite difficult but I was relieved that my teacher introduced us to Nikkei Telecom.h




The contest was a success for all participants and it was good to receive such positive comments from both students and staff. It is also hoped that the contest will provide opportunities for learners of Japanese to make further speeches in Japanese and to inspire more students to improve their proficiency in Japanese.

We congratulate all of this yearfs contestants and extend a warm thank you to their lecturers and friends. They really took the time to support the contestants and ensure the success of the event.
We will continue to encourage and assist Japanese learners in improving their reading and writing skills through Nikkei Telecom.

If you are interested in Nikkei Telecom for educational purposes, please contact the Electronic Media department click here for an Enquiry Form or Email telecom21@eur.nikkei.com.


The Second Nikkei Telecom Speech Contest
April 2015@

The Second Nikkei Telecom Speech Contest was held at the University of Edinburgh on 25th April 2015 for their final year students taking the Japanese Language Course. This was part of their Japanese Language 4 course assessment to provide an opportunity to engage in gReal life vs Manyh situations and to demonstrate their communication skills.
Thirteen students in total took part in the contest and were required to write a brief introduction and make a five minute speech on the topic of their choice using Nikkei Telecom as their source.

First prize was awarded to Toma Williams: gMinna ga Chigau Kokusaikah, a speech which questions the meaning of gglobalisationh and distinguishes her understanding from portrayed gglobalisationh found in recent publications in Japan.
Zoe Vincent: gOnsen to body imageh was awarded second prize. The topic covers peoplefs insecurity with their body shapes and sizes, and how visiting an gOnsenh could change the way we think.
The Nikkei Telecom Award, for the best user of Nikkei Telecom database, was awarded to Dave Farrell: gIenai mondai: Jisatsuh, who gave a speech on the significant social issue in Japan, suicide. He based his speech on the article of gIjimeh and gave his thoughts on how to tackle this issue through his own experience.
Additional prizes were given to Duncan Murray: gNihon shakai no generation gaph and Dijana Nikodinovska: gNihon equal Shudanshugi?h for their efforts, indicating high levels of Japanese language skills throughout the contest.
The awarded students were given a certificate of commendation and prizes from Nikkei Europe, and in addition the first prize winner was invited to the office of Nikkei Europe in London.

The contest was a success for all participating parties and it was good to receive such positive comments from both students and staff. Recent feedback showed the service to be greatly beneficial for their Japanese studies as quoted;

gI found it useful to be able to narrow down my search of articles using the dates between which I was looking for data.h
gI was very surprised by the large number of articles that are available on the Nikkei Telecom. I think that students from different academic areas can use the articles for their studiesch




Many congratulations to all participants and also a big thank you to their lecturers and supporters. We hope Nikkei Telecom Japanese Speech Contest provided valuable experience for students.

If you are interested in Nikkei Telecom for educational purposes, please contact the Electronic Media department click here for Enquiry Form or Email telecom21@eur.nikkei.com.


The First Nikkei Telecom Japanese Speech Contest
February 2014@

The first Nikkei Telecom Speech Contest was organised by The University of Manchester with Nikkei Europe Ltd. The contest was held for the final year students of Japanese Studies at The University of Manchester and 10 finalists from the course were selected to participate in it. These finalists were judged by three lecturers from The University of Manchester and two from Nikkei Europe.

First prize was awarded to Serena Cheung, who spoke on gGyaku-Sekuhara? Dansei mo Nayamuh, sexual harassment targeted towards men in the work place in Japan.
Valeria Pieroni was chosen for second prize, whose topic covered the language issue, the importance of translation for the society. "Honyaku wa Sekai no Tameni".
The Nikkei Telecom Award for the best user of Nikkei Telecom database went to Nicholas Lavin, who gave a speech on the same sex marriage, gDouseikon wa Mitomerareru bekika?h

The final year students were required to make a speech and simple presentation using Nikkei Telecom for their research on chosen topics. They have not only achieved exceptionally high level of Japanese speaking ability, but also demonstrated their deep understanding of the topic.
The topics were much diverse, such as on Japanese culture as well the society, environmental and safety issues, social identity theory and gender, and the aging society issues, which were well explained by analysing various articles from Nikkei Shimbun.

gIt was a new experience using Nikkei Telecom in classes since there arenft many opportunities to read Japanese newspapers in the UK. I can always pick up some Japanese news from the internet but not always reliable to use for my class assignments. So Nikkei Telecom was useful to get a broad range of information on a topic, just simply type in keywords and search!h
Serena


Many congratulations to all participants and also a big thank you to their lecturers and supporters. We hope Nikkei Telecom Japanese Speech Contest provided valuable experience for students.

If you are interested in Nikkei Telecom for educational purposes, please contact the Electronic Media department click here for Enquiry Form or Email telecom21@eur.nikkei.com.
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